News and Events


GOLF CARTS

Enclosed with the annual assessment mailing sent to all lot owners in January was a copy of a letter from the Cartersville Police Department concerning golf carts.  Portions of that letter are reprinted herein so you are reminded of their importance.

Effective January 1, 2012, OCGA 40-6-363 provides the following described requirements pertaining to the use of motorized carts, otherwise known as “golf carts”, and other recreational equipment such as gators, mules, rhinos, rangers, etc. OCGA 40-6-363 states that all personal transportation vehicles shall have the following equipment:

(1) A braking system sufficient for the weight and passenger capacity of the vehicle, including a parking brake;

(2) A reverse warning device functional at all times when the directional control is in the reverse position;

(3) A main power switch. When the switch is in the “off” position, or the key or other device that activates the switch is removed, the motive power circuit shall be inoperative. If the switch uses a key, it shall be removable only in the “off” position;

(4) Head lamps; (5) Reflex reflectors; (6) Tail lamps; (7) Horn; (8) A rearview mirror; (9) Safety warning labels; and (10) Hip restraints and hand holds.

 

Existing laws require the following with the use of these vehicles:

(1)Every person operating a low-speed vehicle will be granted all the rights and subjected to the same duties applicable to any other vehicle being operated upon the roadways;

(2)Low-speed vehicles may not overtake other vehicles within the same lane and may not be operated with two or more abreast within one single lane;

(3)Low-speed vehicles may only be operated on roadways where the posted speed limit does not exceed 35 mph;

(4)Motorized carts may only be operated on roadways during daylight hours, as defined by OCGA 40-8-20; and

(5)Because operators are subjected to all the same duties as operators of any vehicle being operated on the roadways, a valid driver’s license is required to operate such vehicles.

Security


One of the best ways to deter crime in our neighborhood is to not allow our homes and vehicles to become easy targets.  A great deal of the crime in our neighborhood is theft from unlocked cars and open garages.  By keepping our cars locked and our garage doors shut we can sent the message that our neighborhood is not an easy target anymore.